MVPDays – January 2019 Edition

I’m pretty stoked to have been selected to present at the MVP Days online conference on January 30, 2019. My talk “The First 5 Things to Getting Started with Team: IT Admin Edition” will give you tips on things to consider as you are rolling out.

I found that there is a ton of guidance for getting started with the Microsoft Teams application itself, but not a lot from an administrator perspective. I’d love to hear your thoughts on what should be added after hearing the first five.

You still have time to register, but don’t wait…go ahead and knock it out now.

Microsoft Teams Quick Tip #1 – Fun With Channel Names

One of my favorite things about using Microsoft Teams is how it can bust of out the formal nature of the everyday work environment.  While there is a time and place for putting on your formal attire, there is also time for some fun.  One of the ways we can add a little personality to our Teams is by getting creative with Channel naming.

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Five File Related Gotchas in Microsoft Teams

When uploading files into Microsoft Teams, there are a few gotchas that I wasn’t aware of until I recently tried moving some data into a new Team.  I thought sharing these may be of use to others as well.

  1. If you are moving lots of data, you can only upload 10 files at a time
  2. The files have to contain content…no empty text documents, for example (although not sure why you’d need these anyway.)
  3. By default in the Teams client, you will lose any folder structure if doing a wholesale move of files.  You can manually create the folder before copying files or use a workaround
  4. The maximum file size is 15GB.  More information about the storage limits can be found in Microsoft documentation.
  5. Since these files are just housed in SharePoint Online on the backend, the normal SPO limits apply.

Do you have more tips?  Let’s continue the discussion on Twitter by tweeting @millh0use!

So You Wanna Copy or Move Files to Microsoft Teams?

While consolidating random pieces of documentation into a new Team recently, I noticed that simply copying or moving existing files and folder structures didn’t happen as I expected.  As a best practice, I don’t recommend doing wholesale file moves into Teams.  Instead, you should consider if the files are even needed (because we all know that person who refuses to get rid of the file with the lunchroom menu from 1992 because “you never know”).

If you have a folder and file structure that is ready to be migrated into your Team, though, there is a solution.
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